This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

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School Teachers

Effective use of ICT based science teaching learning objects.

Teachers’ Guidelines

2. Teachers’ self-assessment
2.2 Teachers’ Digital Competence
2.2.1 Digital Competence Framework
The teaching professions face rapidly changing demands, which require a new, broader and more sophisticated set of competences than before. The ubiquity of digital devices and applications, in particular, requires educators to develop their digital competence.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development recognizes that the prevalence of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have a significant potential to accelerate progress, to bridge the digital divide and support the development of inclusive Knowledge Societies.

In this context, it is essential that teachers have the competencies to integrate ICT in their professional practice also need to be able to harness ICT to guide learners in developing Knowledge Society skills such as critical and innovative thinking, complex problem solving, the ability to collaborate, and socio-emotional skills. Teacher training and continued on-going, relevant professional development for teachers are essential if benefits from investments in ICTs are to be realized.

Pedagogical digital competence has been investigated by numerous researchers. On International and national level a number of frameworks, self-assessment tools and training programmes have been developed to describe the facets of digital competence for educators and to help them assess their competence, identify their training needs and offer targeted training. Three major pieces of research have developed models of the competence that express a good level of maturity:

1) The ICT Competency standard for teachers defined by UNESCO, an attempt to identifying pedagogical digital competence to define a framework for teacher professional development and it articulates the competence in six areas (Understanding ICT in education, Curriculum and assessment, Pedagogy, ICT organization and administration, Teacher professional learning). It provides defines three levels: Technology literacy, related to technological competence, Knowledge Deepening, related to capacity apply technology in real problem solving and Knowledge Creation, related to the capacity to use technology to produce new knowledge.

2) The Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Model by Mishra e Koehler that identifies teacher’s digital competence as the intersection of three primary forms of knowledge: Content (CK), Pedagogy (PK), and Technology (TK).

3) the European Framework for the Digital Competence of Educators (DigCompEdu) which will be discussed in the next paragraph.
Other Resources
  • Ilomäki, L., Kantosalo, A., & Lakkala, M. (2011). Which areas of digital competence are important for a teacher? Linked portal. Brussels: European Schoolnet (EUN), 1-12.
  • Krumsvik, Rune Johan.Situated learning and teachers’ digital competence." Education and Information Technologies 13.4 (2008): 279-290.
  • Koehler, Matthew J., and Punya Mishra. "Introducing tpck." Handbook of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) for educators (2008): 3-29.

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